September 19, 2015

Teachers Strike And Trying To Blame The Constitution

BY JOHN GITHONGO Source: www.the-star.co.ke/news/teachers-strike-and-trying-blame-constitution  In 1997 the government made a deal to increase the pay of Kenya’s chronically underpaid teachers. It was only partially implemented. As a result, especially at times of political vulnerability for the incumbent administration, like elections and now at the start of every new school year, strikes by our teachers have become a normalized. The current government complains it doesn’t have Sh17 billion to implement the pay rise that the Supreme Court has legitimated much in the same way that the election that brought the current regime into power was legitimised. The teachers – in the 18th year of the fight to have promises made to them kept – are portrayed as fiscally unfeeling and unsympathetic to a Jubilee regime struggling to balance the books during increasingly difficult times. It’s true that times are difficult and
September 19, 2015

Teenage Nation Kenya

We are growing up. And growing up comes with challenges. One of those challenges is growing responsibility. Everybody has had his or her teenage years. Everything you know seems to change: the world around you, your friends, your ideas, your body. What you don’t realize as a teenager, is that you are changing and not the world around you. Looking at Kenyan at the moment it feels like looking at a teenager that is growing up: it’s going against anything her parents (people, constitution, democratic allies) are telling her. ‘I am against, an I will who you who decides.’ Kenya is full of ambitions. The world is at our feet, we even dare to compare out nation with  long established societies worldwide, preferably and convenient often indicated as The West, out former Colonial masters. To a certain extend, the modern
September 13, 2015

Work in progress

It has been a while that I did a posting. I will spare you the reason. At the moment, we are restyling, updating the site to make it compatible with and readable on all the mobile devices readers are using these days. So please come up from time to time and let me know if you have any wishes. Hope to see you back soon!
June 19, 2014

Kenya | Vacancies at State House: Mood Readers wanted (m/f)

An imaginary morning at the President of Kenya’s Office: President gets up, first thing he gets is his security briefing, especially movements that are ICC-related and CORD related, then the press clippings. He goes true with it, gets some emotions with the news, then his personal assistant comes up with today’s agenda. While walking to his vehicle with a tea-to-go in his hands, he gets briefed in more detail about the first meeting today. In the car next to him, his speech-writer talks to him about the print-out mister President has  just been handed over: the speech he going to deliver  at the next function. Eh, wait… stop… Are we missing something here? As in: missing something that we might need, not as in missing something that was there but we didn’t see? Yes! I would say. We are missing
June 18, 2014

Kenya terror | Conspiracy theories and the fun of it. Choose the one of your liking!

Conspiracy number one (1) Kenya’s president blames the opposition for the recent attacks at the coast saying that the opposition wants to destabilize the country. I am sure he has read Aristotle’s Rhetoric, because he successfully diverts the subject from what has actually happened to Who is responsible, thus diverting the attention from your own role to someone else’s, at least thats what he thinks. A proven technic, just look at world history to find your examples. By the way: these technics were very successful on masses that did not, or could not check the facts and connect the dots. Does it make sense? Mmm… I wonder. Al Shabaab claimed responsibility before the Kenyan Government came with a statement, according to local newspapers, people were warned even before the attack took place. Does the opposition party really gain by an
May 21, 2014

The invisible consequences of terror

Since the Westgate attacks, Kenya has been hit by 14 terror attacks, leaving tens of Kenyan people dead and even more Kenyans wounded. Most of them are common men, women and children whose main day to day concern is how to feed their families and their loved ones. For the rest of the world, live continues after the 8 o’ clock news. For the victims, life will not easily be the same as before an attack. Admit: for most people, terror attacks is something you hear about on the television news. For a few seconds, maybe minutes or days, you are in a shock. We live I a society where most people are familiar with televised violence. I wonder if most people would actually notice the difference between the real world, created in the News and the entertainment world, let’s
April 2, 2012
Kenyan girls come up for their rights

Kenyan sex workers: signs of progress

Yes, being in Kenya is great. But for me, it is not for the obvious reasons: not the safari’s, it’s not only the beautiful nature less than 30 minutes outside Nairobi. Europeans tend to think that when you live in Kenya, it’s a 24 hour safari-holiday. Nothing is less true. It’s because in Kenya where I have a live view on social and political change in Africa. You can witness it on the spot: quite often, there is change for the better. Recently, it was worldwide sex workers day. The 7000 or more known sex workers known in Kenya’s capital Nairobi took to the streets to say that they are ready to pay tax.  Prostitution is still seen as a crime in Kenya. The funny thing: in a country where women are often seen as minor creatures, not the consumers
September 3, 2010

Goosebumps and tears

Funny feelings about the historic promulgation of Kenya’s new constitution. I did hardly see any prominent ‘good’ leader at the signing ceremony. All of them at least had a disputable reputation. But my impression might be wrong. The number one among those of course is mister Omar al-Bashir, the democratically elected and International sought for leader of Sudan, not really known for his sympathy with the democratic policies and known for of several genocides he’s thought to have been guilty of. Interesting is that Kenya recently confirmed its support for the I.C.C. and said that they would fully cooperate with the I.C.C., in a meeting notably in Kampala. Kenya said that as an I.C.C.-memberstate they oblige themselves to arrest fugitives on their territories. Several sources said that al-Bashir was not on the invitee-list. But that is not an excuse. In
February 22, 2010
Caprivi Gambling Machines

Namibia / Gambling machines from Russia in Caprivi

On my trip through Namibia’s Caprivi Strip, I stopped at a small coffee joint to satisfy my caffeine-needs. In the end, I am still a Dutch. It was not my first time that I visited this small place in one of the poorest areas of beautiful Namibia. The type of area where people die of malaria because they can’t find transport to the nearest hospital or can’t spend two dollar to safe their own baby’s life. On the outside, nothing had changed. Still the dark orange/brown red-earthy color. Inside still the slow service and the super friendly girl who looks like she doesn’t need anybody as a customer today. Yes: everything looked as usual: I was even happy with the absence of Take Away Coffees. The mugs are on the way, like two years ago, I was told. But I
October 16, 2008

Kenya / Promptly Establish Special Tribunal

Human Rights Watch: Government, Donors Should Support Commission’s Findings on Election Violence [inspic=143,left,,thumb](New York, October 15, 2008) – The Kenyan government and international partners should strongly support the call by the Waki commission investigating post-election violence to create a special tribunal to end Kenya’s cycle of impunity, Human Rights Watch said today. “The Waki commission has done an admirable job describing the causes of the violence and assembling evidence,” said Georgette Gagnon, Africa director at Human Rights Watch. “Now the politicians need to set up the special tribunal it recommends. Justice is crucial for Kenya’s stability.” The report of the Commission of Inquiry into Post-Election Violence, headed by Justice Philip Waki, was published on October 15, 2008. The commission concluded that politicians on all sides had organized and funded attacks on supporters of their opponents. The inquiry also found that