June 19, 2014

Kenya | Vacancies at State House: Mood Readers wanted (m/f)

An imaginary morning at the President of Kenya’s Office: President gets up, first thing he gets is his security briefing, especially movements that are ICC-related and CORD related, then the press clippings. He goes true with it, gets some emotions with the news, then his personal assistant comes up with today’s agenda. While walking to his vehicle with a tea-to-go in his hands, he gets briefed in more detail about the first meeting today. In the car next to him, his speech-writer talks to him about the print-out mister President has  just been handed over: the speech he going to deliver  at the next function. Eh, wait… stop… Are we missing something here? As in: missing something that we might need, not as in missing something that was there but we didn’t see? Yes! I would say. We are missing
June 18, 2014

Kenya terror | Conspiracy theories and the fun of it. Choose the one of your liking!

Conspiracy number one (1) Kenya’s president blames the opposition for the recent attacks at the coast saying that the opposition wants to destabilize the country. I am sure he has read Aristotle’s Rhetoric, because he successfully diverts the subject from what has actually happened to Who is responsible, thus diverting the attention from your own role to someone else’s, at least thats what he thinks. A proven technic, just look at world history to find your examples. By the way: these technics were very successful on masses that did not, or could not check the facts and connect the dots. Does it make sense? Mmm… I wonder. Al Shabaab claimed responsibility before the Kenyan Government came with a statement, according to local newspapers, people were warned even before the attack took place. Does the opposition party really gain by an
May 16, 2013

Who is removing the stones from Kenya’s Acres?

I was in the beautiful Semien Mountains in Northern Ethiopia recently. On an extremely high altitude, people were still growing barley. I will spare you the story of how and when those people arrived there. What I noticed were the way these people were able to grow barley in this predominantly rough, rocky, cold area: they remove the stones from the acres, one by one, to remain with a clear acre and a good harvest. Kenya has a new government with ambitious plans being explained in good rhetoric and with a fresh unconventional cabinet of mostly non-politicians (sworn in today). All very promising, but it’s not the names that matter but about how a these modern style-leaders are gonna deal with the small things that Kenyans are dealing with: the stones in its acres that avoid that the barley can