Kenya | Vacancies at State House: Mood Readers wanted (m/f)

  An imaginary morning at the President of Kenya’s Office: President gets up, first thing he gets is his security briefing, especially movements that are ICC-related and CORD related, then the press clippings. He goes true with it, gets some emotions with the news, then his personal assistant comes up with today’s agenda. While walking to his vehicle with a tea-to-go in his hands, he gets briefed in more detail about the first meeting today. In the car next to him, his speech-writer talks to him about the print-out mister President has  just been handed over: the speech he going to deliver  at the next function. Eh, wait… stop… Are we missing something here? As in: missing something that we might need, not as in missing something that was there but we didn’t see? Yes! I would say. We are missing the briefing by the chief mood reader!!! The guy,

The invisible consequences of terror

Since the Westgate attacks, Kenya has been hit by 14 terror attacks, leaving tens of Kenyan people dead and even more Kenyans wounded. Most of them are common men, women and children whose main day to day concern is how to feed their families and their loved ones. For the rest of the world, live continues after the 8 o’ clock news. For the victims, life will not easily be the same as before an attack. Admit: for most people, terror attacks is something you hear about on the television news. For a few seconds, maybe minutes or days, you are in a shock. We live I a society where most people are familiar with televised violence. I wonder if most people would actually notice the difference between the real world, created in the News and the entertainment world, let’s say the world of Jack Bauer in 24, and the

Kenya / Promptly Establish Special Tribunal

Human Rights Watch: Government, Donors Should Support Commission’s Findings on Election Violence [inspic=143,left,,thumb](New York, October 15, 2008) – The Kenyan government and international partners should strongly support the call by the Waki commission investigating post-election violence to create a special tribunal to end Kenya’s cycle of impunity, Human Rights Watch said today. “The Waki commission has done an admirable job describing the causes of the violence and assembling evidence,” said Georgette Gagnon, Africa director at Human Rights Watch. “Now the politicians need to set up the special tribunal it recommends. Justice is crucial for Kenya’s stability.” The report of the Commission of Inquiry into Post-Election Violence, headed by Justice Philip Waki, was published on October 15, 2008. The commission concluded that politicians on all sides had organized and funded attacks on supporters of their opponents. The inquiry also found that security forces responded inappropriately, using excessive force against civilians, intervening